Reopening Businesses

On June 15, all capacity limits and distancing requirements were lifted in California, and most businesses are able to return to full operations. The City of Pasadena has joined the state in lifting most COVID-19 restrictions.

Even as businesses resume full operations, COVID-19 continues to pose a risk to communities, particularly among unvaccinated individuals, and it is important for employers to continue to take steps to reduce the risk of COVID-19 transmission among their workers and customers.

Below is a summary of risk-reducing measures for employers to keep their workers, customers, and communities safer from COVID-19. In addition to this information, remember: Employers who fall under the scope of the Cal/OSHA COVID-19 Prevention Emergency Temporary Standards  (ETS) must remain in compliance with these Standards.

PREVENT AND REDUCE TRANSMISSION AMONG EMPLOYEES

Encourage Vaccination

COVID-19 vaccines are safe and effective and are the best way to prevent COVID-19 outbreaks in the workplace and in the community. COVID-19 vaccine is widely available now in every community. Offer employees paid time off to get vaccinated and consider offering a vaccination clinic at your workplace to make it more convenient for your employees to get vaccinated. Consider opportunities to incentivize your employees to get vaccinated or to make it easier to get vaccinated. This might include offering rewards such as paid time off or cash bonus payments, or policies that are more relaxed for employees who are fully vaccinated against COVID-19.

Follow Face Mask Rules

State face mask requirements for employees vary by sector, although at a minimum, unvaccinated individuals are required to wear a face mask when indoors at workplaces. Face masks help prevent workers who do not know they have the virus that causes COVID-19 from spreading it to others, and they provide protection to the wearer as well. Employees who work in a setting where they are in close contact with other people who may not be fully vaccinated should be provided a higher level of protection, such as wearing two masks (“double-masking”) or a respirator (e.g., KN95 or N95). This is particularly important if the employee is not fully vaccinated and is in an indoor or crowded outdoor setting. For more information about masks and about double masking, see the CDC guidance for mask use.

Actively Encourage and Support Symptomatic, Infected, Or Exposed Employees To Stay Home

Employees should conduct daily symptom checks before or upon arrival to the workplace. The screening prior to arrival should include asking if the employee has had contact with a person known to be infected with COVID-19 in the last 14 days, and whether the individual is currently under isolation or quarantine orders. Consult the CDC website for the most current list of COVID-19 symptoms.

  • Send employees home immediately if they arrive sick or become sick during the day. Encourage sick employees to contact their medical provider.  Employees who need information on health insurance or providers can call 211.
  • Notify employees that they are not to come to work if sick or if they are exposed to a person who has COVID-19.  Employers must comply with Cal/OSHA Emergency Temporary Standards which may be stricter than requirements of the Pasadena Public Health Department (PPHD). For the purposes of PPHD, employees who are fully vaccinated for COVID-19 do not need to quarantine after exposure to someone with COVID-19 if asymptomatic, and may come to work if asymptomatic.
  • Require an employee with COVID-19 to stay home for at least 10 days AND at least 24 hours after fever has resolved (without use of fever-reducing medications) AND after symptoms have improved.
  • Institute a plan in the event that one or more employees is diagnosed (by a physician or lab test) with COVID-19.  The plan should include immediate isolation of the employee at home and self-quarantine of everyone that came into contact (within 6 feet for a cumulative total of 15 minutes or more over a 24-hour period, regardless of whether a mask was worn) with the ill employee, except fully vaccinated individuals who are asymptomatic.  The plan should also include options for all employees identified as contacts to be tested for COVID-19 with an FDA-approved diagnostic test (for example PCR test and not a blood test) if they are not fully vaccinated. However, contacts must still maintain quarantine for 10 days, even with a negative test, if they are not fully vaccinated.

REPORT COVID-19 CASES AND OUTBREAKS

Establishments must take steps to reduce the risk of an outbreak occurring among employees.  Depending on the situation, public notification of an exposure to COVID-19 may be required.

  • Establishments are required to make an immediate report to the Pasadena Public Health Department any time an employee with COVID-19 (confirmed by a lab test or physician diagnosis) was at the establishment while sick or up to 48 hours before showing symptoms or receiving a positive test (if asymptomatic). Operators must email nursing@cityofpasadena.net or call (626) 744-6089 and provide all information requested by the Health Department.  The employer is expected to provide or ensure testing for all employees who have had a possible exposure and must follow the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidance for cleaning and disinfecting the facility.  Testing resources can be found through the employee’s physician, and also at https://www.cityofpasadena.net/covid-19/ and https://covid19.lacounty.gov/.
  • Educate employees to contact their supervisor if they are feeling sick. The supervisor should send the ill employee home immediately, taking care to maintain that person’s privacy and observing physical distancing. If the person cannot leave the premises right away, utilize a safe, designated space for isolation (6 feet or more away from others).
  • Work with the Pasadena Public Health Department to investigate any COVID-19 illness. Prepare employee records, facility floor plans, and shift/attendance logs to provide information as quickly as possible to the Health Department, including accurate contact information (phone, address, email) of all employees and visitors (if possible) who were in contact within 6 feet of the infectious employee for a cumulative 15 minutes or more in a 24-hour period, and other individuals as specified by the Health Department.

MAINTAIN HEALTHY BUSINESS OPERATIONS

Reinforce Paid Leave Policies

Review your workplace leave policies and modify them to ensure that employees are not penalized when they stay home due to illness. Make sure that your employees are aware that they may be eligible for benefits such as paid sick leave or workers’ compensation if they become sick with COVID-19, are caring for someone with COVID-19, or if they need to quarantine due to exposure. Workers may also be eligible for paid leave to go to COVID-19 vaccination appointments or to recover from symptoms after getting their vaccination.

Protect Employees Who are at Higher Risk of Severe Illness

Offer telework options for those at higher risk, or consider assigning duties that minimize the employee’s contact with customers and other employees.

Make Meals and Break Times Safer

  • Encourage employees to eat outdoors or alone in a closed office unless everyone is fully vaccinated. Stagger employee break times so fewer employees are using lunch or breakrooms at a time.
  • Reconfigure break rooms to enable employees to maintain physical distancing while eating. Place signage to remind staff about safe meals and breakrooms, including occupancy limits.

MAINTAIN A HEALTHY WORK ENVIRONMENT

Increase Ventilation

Effective ventilation is one of the most important ways to control small aerosol transmission. Make sure your building’s HVAC system is in good, working order. Consider installing portable high-efficiency air cleaners, upgrading the building’s air filters to the highest efficiency possible, and making other modifications to increase the quantity of outside air and ventilation in all working areas. When weather and working conditions allow, increase fresh outdoor air by opening windows and doors in accordance with safety and fire codes. Consider using fans to increase the effectiveness of open windows. Decrease occupancy in areas where outdoor ventilation cannot be increased.

Ensure Water System Safety

To minimize the risk of Legionnaire’s disease and other diseases associated with water, take steps to ensure that all water systems and features (e.g., drinking fountains, decorative fountains) are safe to use after a prolonged facility shutdown. This includes proper flushing and may require additional cleaning steps (including disinfection). Follow the CDC Guidance for Building Water Systems, which describes the 8 steps you should take before reopening your business or building.

Support Hand Hygiene

Provide handwashing facilities for employees and ensure that they have adequate time to wash their hands during work time. Encourage employees to wash their hands for at least 20 seconds each time. Hand sanitizer should contain at least 60% alcohol. Do not provide hand sanitizers with methyl alcohol. See the CDC guidance, When and How to Wash Your Hands.

Cleaning and Disinfection

Worksites should consult CDC cleaning guidance to help determine how frequently their facility needs to be cleaned and/or disinfected. Cleaning once a day is usually enough. Employers should identify and regularly clean frequently touched surfaces and objects such as doorknobs, elevator buttons, tools, handrails, phones, headsets, bathroom surfaces and steering wheels. Any materials, areas, equipment or objects used by a COVID-19 case during the high-risk exposure period must be disinfected and may not be used by another employee for 24 hours after disinfection.

GUIDANCE FOR BUSINESSES, VENUE OPERATORS OR HOSTS

In settings where masks are required only for unvaccinated individuals, businesses, venue operators or hosts may choose to:

  • Provide information to all patrons, guests and attendees regarding vaccination requirements and allow vaccinated individuals to self-attest that they are in compliance prior to entry.
  • Implement vaccine verification to determine whether individuals are required to wear a mask.
  • Require all patrons to wear masks.

No person can be prevented from wearing a mask as a condition of participation in an activity or entry into a business.

Exemptions are listed in the State Face Mask Guidance.

VERIFYING VACCINATION STATUS OR NEGATIVE TEST RESULTS

Verifying Full Vaccination

Employers and business operators may be required by the CA State Health Officer to verify an employee or customer’s vaccination status. Individuals are considered fully vaccinated for COVID-19:

  • 2 weeks or more after they have received the second dose in a 2-dose vaccine series (Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna), or
  • 2 weeks or more after they have received a single-dose vaccine (Johnson and Johnson [J&J]/Janssen).

With a photo ID, the following are acceptable as proof of full vaccination for COVID-19 and must include the name of person vaccinated, type of vaccine provided and date last dose was administered (a photo ID is not required for children/minors):

  • Vaccination card, or
  • A printed or digital photo of the person’s vaccination card stored on a phone or electronic device, or
  • Documentation of full vaccination from a healthcare provider

 Verifying Pre-entry Negative Testing

  • Definition: Testing must be conducted within 72 hours before event start time (both PCR and antigen are acceptable). Results of the test must be available prior to entry into the event or venue.
  • Verification: The following are acceptable as proof of a negative COVID-19 test result: printed document (from the test provider or laboratory) OR an email or text message displayed on a phone from the test provider or laboratory. The information should include person's name, type of test performed, and negative test result (date of test must be within prior 72 hours). Businesses and venue operators may also utilize self-attestation at point of registration, during ticket purchase or on the day of the event prior to entry into the venue

COMMUNICATE COVID-19 POLICIES

Use your online outlets and signage at the entry to your business to explain your business’s COVID-19 policies, including the message that visitors should not enter the premises if sick. In compliance with the state masking order, ensure that unvaccinated visitors or customers at any indoor sites are wearing face masks. Consider requiring all customers or visitors to wear face masks if you are unable to verify vaccination status.

QUESTIONS

For more information visit the PPHD website, CDC website, or covid19.ca.gov.  For questions contact the Pasadena Citizen Service Center at 626-744-7311 or https://www.cityofpasadena.net/CSC.

 

On June 15, all capacity limits and distancing requirements were lifted in California, and most businesses are able to return to full operations. The City of Pasadena has joined the state in lifting most COVID-19 restrictions.

Even as businesses resume full operations, COVID-19 continues to pose a risk to communities, and it is important for employers to continue to take steps to reduce the risk of COVID-19 transmission among their workers and visitors. Below is a summary of best practices for businesses that operate out of offices to consider as they transition to full operations. In addition to this information, please remember:

Please be sure to read and follow the general guidance for businesses, above. The best practices below are intended to supplement the general guidance.

REQUIRE MASKS FOR EMPLOYEES IN COMPLIANCE WITH STATE GUIDANCE AND CAL/OSHA ETS

SCREEN CUSTOMERS, VENDORS, AND DELIVERY PEOPLE

  • Post signage to remind everyone who enters your establishment that they should NOT enter if they have symptoms of COVID-19 or if they are under isolation or quarantine orders.

REDUCE CROWDING, ESPECIALLY INDOORS

  • If possible, maintain an outdoor break area for employees so they can take their breaks outdoors.
  • In indoor break areas, keep tables at a 6-foot distance and post occupancy signs to reduce the risk of crowding.
  • Control access to self-service areas, such as beverage service stations, by keeping them closed or limiting access to them as self-service areas encourage employees to congregate and require use of common utensils and dispensers.
  • Consider use of partitions between cubicles to protect staff who are not fully vaccinated and have frequent close contact with other employees or visitors.

VENTILATE

  • Make sure your building’s HVAC system is in good, working order.
  • Consider installing portable high-efficiency air cleaners, upgrading the building’s air filters to the highest efficiency possible, and making other modifications to increase the quantity of outside air and ventilation in all working areas.
  • When weather and working conditions allow, increase fresh outdoor air by opening windows and doors. Consider using fans to increase the effectiveness of open windows - position window fans to blow air outward, not inward.
  • Decrease occupancy in areas where outdoor ventilation cannot be increased.
  • See State Interim guidance for Ventilation, Filtration, and Air Quality in Indoor Environments.

SUPPORT HANDWASHING

  • Place handwashing stations or hand sanitizer at entry and outside communal bathrooms with signage promoting use.
  • Encourage frequent handwashing.

COMMUNICATE

  • Post signage so that visitors who are entering your office building are aware of your policies.
  • Use your online platforms to communicate your COVID-19 safety policies to the public.

 

On June 15, all capacity limits and distancing requirements were lifted in California, and most businesses are able to return to full operations. Los Angeles County has joined the state in lifting most COVID-19 restrictions.

Even as businesses resume full operations, COVID-19 continues to pose a risk to communities, and it is important for employers to continue to take steps to reduce the risk of COVID-19 transmission among their workers and customers. Below is a summary of best practices for businesses that host large events to consider as they transition to full operations. These are recommended for all large events, not just mega events. In addition to this information, please remember:

 Please be sure to read and follow the general guidance for businesses, above. The best practices below are intended to supplement the general guidance.

REQUIRE MASKS IN COMPLIANCE WITH STATE GUIDANCE

SCREEN ATTENDEES

  • Screen guests, staff, performers, and crew for symptoms before they attend the event and ask them not to attend if they have symptoms of COVID-19 or if they are under isolation or quarantine orders.
  • Consider requiring all guests to attest that they are either fully vaccinated against COVID-19 or will have had a negative COVID-19 test within 72 hours of attending your event.

REDUCE CROWDING, ESPECIALLY INDOORS

  • Establish procedures to prevent crowding among persons waiting to enter or exit an event.
  • If there will be a presentation or performance, maintain a 6-foot distance from performers and audience members unless there is verification that everyone is fully vaccinated. Place any unvaccinated performers that sing, yell, or play wind and brass instruments at least 6 feet away from others.
  • Follow Food and Beverage Service recommendations if you serve refreshments at your event. Dining outdoors is best. If indoors, it is recommended that you have a separate area in your venue for drinking and dining to minimize mixing of people who are not wearing face masks.

SUPPORT HANDWASHING

  • Place handwashing stations or hand sanitizer at entry and outside communal bathrooms with signage promoting use.
  • Encourage frequent handwashing.

VENTILATE

  • If your event is held indoors, make sure your building’s HVAC system is in good, working order.
  • Maximize ventilation. Options include installing portable high-efficiency air cleaners, upgrading the building’s air filters to the highest efficiency possible, and making other modifications to increase the quantity of outside air and ventilation in all working areas.
  • When weather and working conditions allow, increase fresh outdoor air by opening windows and doors. Consider using fans to increase the effectiveness of open windows – position window fans to blow air outward, not inward.
  • Decrease occupancy in areas where outdoor ventilation cannot be increased. Consider use of carbon dioxide monitors to monitor the effectiveness of your ventilation in more densely occupied indoor spaces.
  • See State Interim guidance for Ventilation, Filtration, and Air Quality in Indoor Environments.

COMMUNICATE

  • Use advanced registration as much as possible for your event so you know how many people will attend. Advanced registration can also help you to convey your COVID-19 safety plans to guests before they attend.
  • Use your online platforms to communicate your COVID-19 safety policies to the public.
  • Make sure all guests are aware of and follow the Los Angeles County Department of Health Travel Advisory.

 

On June 15, all capacity limits and distancing requirements were lifted in California, and most businesses are able to return to full operations. The City of Pasadena has joined the state in lifting most COVID-19 restrictions.

Even as businesses resume full operations, COVID-19 continues to pose a risk to communities, and it is important for employers to continue to take steps to reduce the risk of COVID-19 transmission among their workers and customers. Below is a summary of best practices for businesses that serve food and beverages, such as restaurants, bars, breweries, wineries and distilleries, to consider as they transition to full operations. In addition to this information, please remember:

Please be sure to read and follow the general guidance for businesses, above. The best practices below are intended to supplement the general guidance.

ADHERE TO THE CALIFORNIA RETAIL FOOD CODE

Food facilities must continue to adhere to all food safety practices outlined in the California Retail Food Code (CRFC).

  • Self-service operations (e.g., buffets, soda-dispensing, bulk-food bins, food sampling) may be offered; continue to periodically check these areas as required and clean and sanitize frequently touched surfaces regularly.
  • Self-service areas with condiment caddies, utensil caddies, napkins, lids, straws, may be offered for customer self-service.

REQUIRE MASKS FOR EMPLOYEES IN COMPLIANCE WITH STATE GUIDANCE

SCREEN CUSTOMERS, VENDORS, AND DELIVERY PEOPLE

  • Post signage to remind everyone who enters your establishment that they should NOT enter if they have symptoms of COVID-19 or if they are under isolation or quarantine orders.

REDUCE CROWDING INDOORS

  • If possible, maintain or expand your outdoor dining capacity to enable more customers to eat outside where ventilation is better.
  • Indoors, limit your occupancy by arranging tables to maintain a 6-foot physical distance between tables.
  • Control access to self-service areas, such as buffets, salad bars, and beverage service stations so as to avoid customers congregating; place servers when possible, to eliminate customer use of common utensils and dispensers.

VENTILATE

  • Continue to maintain your building’s HVAC system in good, working order.
  • Consider installing portable high-efficiency air cleaners, upgrading the building’s air filters to the highest efficiency possible, and making other modifications to increase the quantity of outside air and ventilation in all working areas.
  • When weather and working conditions allow, increase fresh outdoor air by opening windows and doors. Consider using fans to increase the effectiveness of open windows - position window fans to blow air outward, not inward.
  • Decrease occupancy in areas where outdoor ventilation cannot be increased.
  • Keep your background music volume low so that customers and employees do not have to talk loudly to be heard.
  • See State Interim guidance for Ventilation, Filtration, and Air Quality in Indoor Environments.

SUPPORT HANDWASHING

  • Place handwashing signs at handwashing sinks inside restroom facilities reminding patrons to wash their hands. Food employees are required to wash their hands as outlined in the CRFC.
  • Continue to encourage frequent handwashing by employees.
  • Continue to offer hand sanitizer at entry of facility with signage promoting use.

COMMUNICATE

  • Post signage so that customers who are entering your establishment are aware of your policies.
  • Use your online platforms to communicate your COVID-19 safety policies to the public.
  • Consider using a reservation system to keep the number of people in your establishment steady and/or using an online waiting list that enables customers who are waiting for a table to wait outside or in their cars instead of indoors.

 

On June 15, all capacity limits and distancing requirements were lifted in California, and most businesses are able to return to full operations. The City of Pasadena has joined the state in lifting most COVID-19 restrictions.

Even as businesses resume full operations, COVID-19 continues to pose a risk to communities, and it is important for employers to continue to take steps to reduce the risk of COVID-19 transmission among their workers and visitors. Below is a summary of best practices for businesses that provide personal care services to consider as they transition to full operations. In addition to this information, please remember:

 Please be sure to read and follow the general guidance for businesses, above. The best practices below are intended to supplement the general guidance.

REQUIRE MASKS IN COMPLIANCE WITH STATE GUIDANCE

SCREEN CUSTOMERS

  • Post signage to remind customers that they should NOT enter if they have symptoms of COVID-19 or if they are under isolation or quarantine orders.

REDUCE CROWDING INDOORS

  • Maintain your outdoor service area to enable greater occupancy outdoors.
  • Control access to self-service areas, such as pastry and beverage service stations to avoid customers congregating; consider serving refreshments directly to customers to avoid customer use of common utensils and dispensers.

VENTILATE

  • Maintain your building’s HVAC system in good, working order.
  • Consider installing portable high-efficiency air cleaners, upgrading the building’s air filters to the highest efficiency possible, and making other modifications to increase the quantity of outside air and ventilation in all working areas.
  • When weather and working conditions allow, increase fresh outdoor air by opening windows and doors. Consider using fans to increase the effectiveness of open windows – position window fans to blow air outward, not inward.
  • Decrease occupancy in areas where outdoor ventilation cannot be increased.
  • Keep your background music volume low so that customers and employees do not have to talk loudly to be heard.
  • See State Interim guidance for Ventilation, Filtration, and Air Quality in Indoor Environments.

SUPPORT HANDWASHING

  • Place handwashing stations or hand sanitizer at entry and outside communal bathrooms with signage promoting use.
  • Encourage frequent handwashing.

COMMUNICATE

  • Post signage so that customers who are entering your establishment are aware of your policies. Whenever possible, use an appointment system to keep the number of people in your establishment steady and/or using an online waiting list that enables walk-in customers to wait their turn outside or in their cars instead of in your waiting area.

As On June 15, all capacity limits and distancing requirements were lifted in California, and most businesses are able to return to full operations. The City of Pasadena has joined the state in lifting most COVID-19 restrictions.

Even as businesses resume full operations, COVID-19 continues to pose a risk to communities, and it is important for employers to continue to take steps to reduce the risk of COVID-19 transmission among their workers and customers. Below is a summary of best practices for gyms, fitness centers and other businesses that offer indoor space for exercise to consider as they transition to full operations. In addition to this information, please remember:

 Please be sure to read and follow the general guidance for businesses, above. The best practices below are intended to supplement the general guidance.

REQUIRE MASKS IN COMPLIANCE WITH STATE GUIDANCE

  • If you are not able to verify vaccination status, require all customers bring and wear masks when they are indoors, regardless of vaccination status.
  • Make masks available for those who arrive without them.
  • Employees who work in a setting where they are in close contact with other people who may not be fully vaccinated should be provided a higher level of protection, such as wearing two masks (“double-masking”) or a respirator (e.g., KN95 or N95). This is particularly important if the employee is not fully vaccinated and is in an indoor or crowded outdoor setting.
  • Consider requiring staff to also wear eye protection in addition to a respirator if they are not fully vaccinated and are in close contact with customers.
  • See State Guidance for the Use of Face Coverings.

SCREEN CUSTOMERS

  • Post signage to remind customers that they should NOT enter if they have symptoms of COVID-19 or if they are under isolation or quarantine orders.

REDUCE CROWDING, ESPECIALLY INDOORS

  • Maintain your outdoor service area to enable greater occupancy outdoors where ventilation is better.

VENTILATE

  • Make sure your building’s HVAC system is in good, working order.
  • Consider installing portable high-efficiency air cleaners, upgrading the building’s air filters to the highest efficiency possible, and making other modifications to increase the quantity of outside air and ventilation in all working areas.
  • When weather and working conditions allow, increase fresh outdoor air by opening windows and doors. Consider using fans to increase the effectiveness of open windows - position window fans to blow air outward, not inward.
  • Decrease occupancy in areas where outdoor ventilation cannot be increased.
  • Keep your background music volume low so that customers and employees do not have to talk loudly to be heard.
  • See State Interim guidance for Ventilation, Filtration, and Air Quality in Indoor Environments.

SUPPORT HANDWASHING

  • Place handwashing stations or hand sanitizer at entry and outside communal bathrooms with signage promoting use.
  • Encourage frequent handwashing.

COMMUNICATE

  • Post signage so that visitors who are entering your establishment are aware of your policies.
  • Use your online platforms to communicate your COVID-19 safety policies to the public.