COVID-19 Vaccine

Vaccine Record Replacement Cards:  COVID-19 vaccine record replacement cards can be provided upon request for a $20 fee. Replacement cards cannot be mailed and can be picked up by appointment only. Call (626) 744-6121 to make an appointment.

Digital COVID-19 Vaccine Record: Your Digital COVID-19 Vaccine Record is an electronic vaccination record drawn from the data stored in the California immunization registry. Fill out the required fields to get a digital record: https://myvaccinerecord.cdph.ca.gov/.

COVID-19 Vaccination Record via Email: Request vaccination record from the California Immunization Registry (CAIR) by completing the online form: https://cairforms.cairweb.org/AuthorizationToRelease/AuthorizationToRelease. Records will be emailed at no cost and may take up to 2-3 weeks. A valid email and photo ID are required to complete the request.

From the start of the pandemic, data and science have guided Pasadena’s response to COVID-19. That continues to be true when it comes to vaccines.

All vaccines used in the U.S. are required to go through extensive safety testing before they are licensed by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) or recommended for widespread use.

Three COVID-19 vaccines have received emergency authorization for use in the U.S. and are available at NO COST to you. All three vaccines are highly effective at preventing disease. Both the Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines require two doses, while the Johnson & Johnson requires only one dose. The vaccines are reactogenic, which means they can cause sore arm, fatigue, headache, and even low-grade fever that lasts one or two days. These reactions indicate that the immune system is responding and the vaccine is working.

Pasadena continues to distribute and administer vaccine doses as quickly and as equitably as possible. Click the links below for more information about each vaccine:

On August 23, 2021, the FDA approved the first COVID-19 vaccine. The vaccine has been known as the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 Vaccine, and will now be marketed as Comirnaty, for the prevention of COVID-19 disease in individuals 16 years of age and older. The vaccine also continues to be available under emergency use authorization (EUA), including for individuals 12 through 15 years of age and for the administration of a third dose in certain immunocompromised individuals.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends an additional mRNA COVID-19 vaccine dose (Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna) for moderately and severely immunocompromised people after an initial 2-dose primary mRNA vaccine series because people with compromised immune systems may have a reduced ability to respond to vaccines, including COVID-19. An additional vaccine dose is not currently recommended by the CDC for immunocompromised persons who received a single dose of the J&J vaccine. The FDA is still evaluating data on the effectiveness of this vaccine for immunocompromised individuals, and other fully vaccinated persons are adequately protected and do not need an additional dose nor a booster dose of COVID-19 vaccine at this time.

Where can I get the vaccine?

As of May 13, 2021, all Californians age 12 and older are eligible to be vaccinated against COVID-19. Pasadena residents should first contact their healthcare provider or local pharmacy for vaccine availability.

You can also visit MyTurn.ca.gov to view a list of Pasadena and other nearby locations offering COVID-19 vaccinations and schedule a vaccine appointment. A parent/legal guardian must accompany minors to their vaccine appointment to provide consent. The Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine is the only COVID-19 vaccine authorized for people age 12 and older. Anyone who does not have internet access or who needs assistance scheduling an appointment on the MyTurn website can contact our Citizen Service Center at (626) 744-7311 Monday - Friday between the hours of 8 a.m. and 4 p.m.

If you are a healthcare worker, contact your employer. If you are a long-term care facility resident, contact your caretaker.

See "Find A Vaccine Site" for COVID-19 vaccine clinics in Pasadena.

The Pasadena Public Health Department is now administering additional doses of the Moderna and Pfizer COVID-19 vaccines to moderately and severely immunocompromised individuals  in accordance with recent CDC recommendations. Talk to your healthcare provider to confirm eligibility. You will be asked to self-attest to eligibility upon registration for an appointment on MyTurn.CA.gov.

COVID-19 Booster Vaccine Doses

On September 24, 2021, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued the following recommendations:

  • The following groups should receive a booster shot of Pfizer-BioNTech’s COVID-19 Vaccine at least 6 months after completing their Pfizer-BioNTech primary series (i.e., the first 2 doses of a COVID-19 vaccine):
    • people aged 65 years and older
    • residents aged 18 years and older in long-term care settings
    • people aged 50–64 years with underlying medical conditions
  • The following groups may receive a booster shot of Pfizer-BioNTech’s COVID-19 Vaccine at least 6 months after completing their Pfizer-BioNTech primary series, based on their individual benefits and risks:
    • people aged 18–49 years with underlying medical conditions
    • people aged 18–64 years at increased risk for COVID-19 exposure and transmission because of occupational or institutional setting

These recommendations only apply to people who previously received a Pfizer-BioNTech primary series (i.e., the first 2 doses of a COVID-19 vaccine). People can talk to their healthcare provider about whether getting a Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 booster shot is appropriate for them.

The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) and CDC’s recommendations are bound by what the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) authorization allows. At this time, the Pfizer-BioNTech booster authorization only applies to people whose primary series was Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine. Individuals who received the Moderna or J&J/Janssen vaccine should not seek a booster dose of Pfizer vaccine. This guidance may be updated as more information becomes available. For more information, visit https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/booster-shot.html.

The Pasadena Public Health Department (PPHD) is now administering Pfizer booster doses. You will be asked to self-attest to eligibility upon registration for an appointment on MyTurn.CA.gov. For assistance in registering for an appointment, contact the Citizen Service Center at (626) 744-7311. At PPHD COVID-19 vaccine clinics, individuals will need to bring proof that they have received two previous Pfizer doses, which for most people will be in the form of the white vaccination card, or a photo of the white card, or a digital record of your two doses.

Check your local pharmacy for availability of booster doses.

Keep checking back for additional provider listings. New locations will be added as they become available. Download a flyer for all COVID-19 clinics hosted by the PPHD.

Appointment Type: Walk-In means you don't need to pre-register for this clinic, but you will have to register on-site. Pre-Registration means you can register for an appointment time using the link/phone number provided in the Register at/Additional Information field.

LocationDateDay(s)TimeVaccine TypeAgeAddressAppointment TypesRegister atAdditional Informationvax_type_hfiltervax_age_hfiltervax_days_hfilterappointment_type_hfilter
Rite-Aid PharmacyDailyModerna18+Multiple LocationsPre-Registration, Walk-Inwww.riteaid.com/pharmacy/covid-qualifiermoderna18dailypre-registration walk-in
Vons PharmacyDailyJohnson & Johnson, Moderna, Pfizer12+Multiple LocationsPre-Registration, Walk-Inwww.vons.com/pharmacy/covid-19.htmljohnson-johnson moderna pfizer12dailypre-registration walk-in
Pasadena ChurchOctober 18, 2021Mon3:30-5:00pmJohnson & Johnson, Pfizer12+404 E. Washington BlvdPre-Registration, Walk-InMyTurn.ca.govjohnson-johnson pfizer12monpre-registration walk-in
Walgreens PharmacyDailyModerna, Pfizer12+Multiple LocationsPre-Registration, Walk-Inwww.walgreens.com/topic/promotion/covid-vaccine.jspmoderna pfizer12dailypre-registration walk-in
Ralphs PharmacyDailyJohnson & Johnson, Moderna, Pfizer12+Multiple LocationsPre-Registration, Walk-Inwww.ralphs.com/rx/covid-eligibilityjohnson-johnson moderna pfizer12dailypre-registration walk-in
Pavilions PharmacyDailyJohnson & Johnson, Moderna, Pfizer12+Multiple LocationsPre-Registration, Walk-Inwww.pavilions.com/pharmacy/covid-19.htmljohnson-johnson moderna pfizer12dailypre-registration walk-in
CVS PharmacyDailyJohnson & Johnson, Moderna, Pfizer12+Multiple LocationsPre-Registration, Walk-Inwww.cvs.com/immunizations/covid-19-vaccinejohnson-johnson moderna pfizer12dailypre-registration walk-in
Villa ParkeOctober 19, 2021Tue10am-12pmJohnson & Johnson, Moderna, Pfizer12+363 E. Villa St.Pre-Registration, Walk-InMyTurn.ca.govjohnson-johnson moderna pfizer12tuepre-registration walk-in
Marshall Fundamental SchoolOctober 27, 2021Wed3:30-5pmPfizer12+990 Allen Ave.Pre-Registration, Walk-InMyTurn.ca.govpfizer12wedpre-registration walk-in
John Muir High SchoolOctober 20, 2021Wed4-5:30pmJohnson & Johnson, Moderna, Pfizer12+1905 Lincoln AvePre-Registration, Walk-InMyTurn.ca.govjohnson-johnson moderna pfizer12wedpre-registration walk-in
Linda Vista LibraryOctober 14, 2021Thu2-4:30pmJohnson & Johnson, Moderna, Pfizer12+1281 Bryant StPre-Registration, Walk-InMyTurn.ca.govjohnson-johnson moderna pfizer12thupre-registration walk-in
San Rafael LibraryOctober 18, 2021Mon2-4:30pmJohnson & Johnson, Moderna, Pfizer12+1240 Nithsdale Rd.Pre-Registration, Walk-InMyTurn.ca.govjohnson-johnson moderna pfizer12monpre-registration walk-in
Santa Catalina LibraryOctober 21, 2021Thu2-4:30pmJohnson & Johnson, Moderna, Pfizer12+999 E. Washington Blvd.Pre-Registration, Walk-InMyTurn.ca.govjohnson-johnson moderna pfizer12thupre-registration walk-in
Hill Avenue LibraryOctober 25, 2021Mon2-4:30pmJohnson & Johnson, Moderna, Pfizer12+55 S. Hill Ave.Pre-Registration, Walk-InMyTurn.ca.govjohnson-johnson moderna pfizer12monpre-registration walk-in
Allendale LibraryOctober 27, 2021Wed2-4:30pmJohnson & Johnson, Moderna, Pfizer12+1130 S. Marengo Ave.Pre-Registration, Walk-InMyTurn.ca.govjohnson-johnson moderna pfizer12wedpre-registration walk-in

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted Emergency Use Authorizations (EUA) for three COVID-19 vaccines which have been shown to be safe and effective as determined by data from the manufacturers and findings from large clinical trials. These data demonstrate that the known and potential benefits of this vaccine outweigh the known and potential harms of becoming infected with COVID-19.

California has its own Scientific Safety Review Workgroup comprised of immunization, public health, academic and other experts who are vetting vaccine safety. The Scientific Safety Review Workgroup has confirmed that the Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna, and Johnson & Johnson vaccines have met high standards for safety and efficacy. View the Emergency Use Authorizations:

On August 23, 2021, the FDA approved the first COVID-19 vaccine. The vaccine has been known as the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 Vaccine, and will now be marketed as Comirnaty, for the prevention of COVID-19 disease in individuals 16 years of age and older. The vaccine also continues to be available under emergency use authorization (EUA), including for individuals 12 through 15 years of age and for the administration of a third dose in certain immunocompromised individuals.

For additional information on vaccine safety, visit www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/safety.html. If you have already received a COVID-19 vaccine, you can register for V-safe to share any side effects you experienced with the CDC and also get reminders if you need a second vaccine dose.

Fully vaccinated individuals should continue wearing masks, staying at least 6 feet apart from others, and avoiding crowds and medium- and large-sized gatherings until the vaccine has been widely distributed.

How the Vaccines Work

The Pfizer and Moderna vaccines are messenger RNA (or mRNA) vaccines
Messenger RNA (mRNA) is found in all living cells. mRNA vaccines work by teaching cells how to make a protein or a piece of a protein that triggers an immune response inside the body. That immune response, which produces antibodies, is what protects against infection if an individual is exposed to the virus.

mRNA is not the same as DNA, and it cannot combine with our DNA to change our genetic code. It is also relatively fragile, and will only hang around inside a cell for about 72 hours, before being degraded. mRNA vaccines do not affect or interact with DNA in any way. mRNA never enters the nucleus of the cell, which is where DNA (genetic material) is stored.

The Johnson & Johnson vaccine is a viral vector vaccine
Viral vector vaccines use a vector (not the virus that causes COVID-19, but a different, harmless virus) to deliver important instructions to our cells to make a small fragment of the COVID-19 virus called the spike protein, which triggers an immune response. Viral vector vaccines do not alter your DNA in any way.

Why is vaccination important?

Vaccination is a safe and effective way to prevent disease. Vaccines save millions of lives each year. When we get vaccinated, we aren’t just protecting ourselves, but also those around us.

Are COVID-19 vaccines safe?

All the COVID-19 vaccines being used have gone through rigorous studies to ensure they are as safe as possible. Systems that allow the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to watch for safety issues are in place across the entire country.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted Emergency Use Authorizations for COVID-19 vaccines that have been shown to meet rigorous safety criteria and be effective as determined by data from the manufacturers and findings from large clinical trials. Clinical trials for all vaccines must first show they meet rigorous criteria for safety and effectiveness before any vaccine, including COVID-19 vaccines, can be authorized or approved for use. The known and potential benefits of a COVID-19 vaccine must outweigh the known and potential risks of the vaccine.

On August 23, 2021, the FDA approved the first COVID-19 vaccine. The vaccine has been known as the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 Vaccine, and will now be marketed as Comirnaty, for the prevention of COVID-19 disease in individuals 16 years of age and older. The vaccine also continues to be available under emergency use authorization (EUA), including for individuals 12 through 15 years of age and for the administration of a third dose in certain immunocompromised individuals.

How many doses of COVID-19 vaccine will I need?

The number of doses needed depends on which vaccine you receive. To get the most protection:

  • Two Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine doses should be given 3 weeks (21 days) apart.
  • Two Moderna vaccine doses should be given 1 month (28 days) apart.
  • Johnson & Johnson (J&J/Janssen) COVID-19 vaccine requires only one dose.

If you receive a vaccine that requires two doses, you should get your second shot as close to the recommended interval as possible. However, your second dose may be given up to 6 weeks (42 days) after the first dose, if necessary. You should not get the second dose earlier than the recommended interval.

Are booster shots available in Pasadena?

On September 24, 2021, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued the following recommendations:

  • The following groups should receive a booster shot of Pfizer-BioNTech’s COVID-19 Vaccine at least 6 months after completing their Pfizer-BioNTech primary series (i.e., the first 2 doses of a COVID-19 vaccine):
    • people aged 65 years and older
    • residents aged 18 years and older in long-term care settings
    • people aged 50–64 years with underlying medical conditions
  • The following groups may receive a booster shot of Pfizer-BioNTech’s COVID-19 Vaccine at least 6 months after completing their Pfizer-BioNTech primary series, based on their individual benefits and risks:
    • people aged 18–49 years with underlying medical conditions
    • people aged 18–64 years at increased risk for COVID-19 exposure and transmission because of occupational or institutional setting

These recommendations only apply to people who previously received a Pfizer-BioNTech primary series (i.e., the first 2 doses of a COVID-19 vaccine). People can talk to their healthcare provider about whether getting a Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 booster shot is appropriate for them.

The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) and CDC’s recommendations are bound by what the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) authorization allows. At this time, the Pfizer-BioNTech booster authorization only applies to people whose primary series was Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine. Individuals who received the Moderna or J&J/Janssen vaccine should not seek a booster dose of Pfizer vaccine. This guidance may be updated as more information becomes available. For more information, visit https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/booster-shot.html.

The Pasadena Public Health Department (PPHD) is now administering Pfizer booster doses. You will be asked to self-attest to eligibility upon registration for an appointment on MyTurn.CA.gov. For assistance in registering for an appointment, contact the Citizen Service Center at (626) 744-7311. At PPHD COVID-19 vaccine clinics, individuals will need to bring proof that they have received two previous Pfizer doses, which for most people will be in the form of the white vaccination card, or a photo of the white card, or a digital record of your two doses.

Are additional doses available in Pasadena?

The CDC recommends an additional mRNA COVID-19 vaccine dose for moderately and severely immunocompromised people after an initial 2-dose primary mRNA vaccine series no sooner than 28 days after a second dose of Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine or Moderna COVID-19 vaccine. Those who believe they qualify for a third dose should speak to their healthcare provider to confirm their eligibility and get vaccinated.

  • An additional vaccine dose is not currently recommended by the CDC for immunocompromised persons who received a single dose of the J&J vaccine. The FDA is still evaluating data on the effectiveness of this vaccine for immunocompromised individuals.
  • Other fully-vaccinated persons are adequately protected and do not need an additional dose nor a booster dose of COVID-19 vaccine at this time.

People with compromised immune systems may have a reduced ability to respond to vaccines, including COVID-19. New data show that a third dose of the mRNA vaccines helps to increase the effectiveness of the vaccine for this group. The need for this third dose is not due to a waning effect of the two-dose regimen.

For additional information, please visit www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/recommendations/immuno.html.

The Pasadena Public Health Department (PPHD) is now administering additional doses of the Moderna and Pfizer COVID-19 vaccines to moderately and severely immunocompromised individuals in accordance with recent CDC recommendations. Talk to your healthcare provider to confirm eligibility. You will be asked to self-attest to eligibility on MyTurn.CA.gov if your provider confirms eligibility for an additional dose.

How do vaccines work?

COVID-19 vaccines help our bodies develop immunity to the virus that causes COVID-19 without us having to get the illness. It typically takes a few weeks for the body to produce antibodies after vaccination. Therefore, it is possible that a person could be infected with the virus that causes COVID-19 just before or just after vaccination and then get sick because the vaccine did not have enough time to provide protection. Sometimes after vaccination, the process of building immunity can cause symptoms, such as fever. These symptoms are normal and are a sign that the body is building immunity.

Will a COVID-19 vaccination prevent me from getting sick with COVID-19?

Unvaccinated people account for the overwhelming majority of COVID-19 hospitalizations and deaths in the U.S.

People who are fully vaccinated are much less likely to be infected with COVID-19 and much less likely to spread the virus to others. Some evidence suggests that vaccination may make illness less severe for those who experience a breakthrough infection and get sick.

For more information, visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website.

If I have already had COVID-19, do I still need to get vaccinated?

Yes. Due to the severe health risks associated with COVID-19 and the fact that reinfection with COVID-19 is possible, you should be vaccinated regardless of whether you already had COVID-19 infection. If you were treated for COVID-19 symptoms with monoclonal antibodies or convalescent plasma, you should wait 90 days before getting a COVID-19 vaccine. Talk to your doctor if you are unsure what treatments you received or if you have more questions about getting a COVID-19 vaccine.

Experts do not yet know how long someone is protected from getting sick again after recovering from COVID-19. The immunity someone gains from having an infection, called “natural immunity,” varies from person to person. It is uncommon for people who do get COVID-19 again to get it within 90 days of when they recovered from their first infection. We won’t know how long immunity produced by vaccination lasts until we have more data on how well the vaccines work.

Will I have to pay to get a COVID-19 vaccine?

No. Your doctor or pharmacy may charge an administration fee for giving the vaccine, but it should be covered by public and private insurance companies. There are no out-of-pocket payments, and no one can be denied a vaccine if they are unable to pay the vaccine administration fee.

People without health insurance can get the COVID-19 vaccine at no cost regardless of immigration or citizenship status. You will not be asked about your immigration or citizenship status at your vaccination appointment.

Do I need to have a scheduled appointment in order to receive the COVID-19 vaccine?

Most vaccine providers do allow walk-ins, but appointments are encouraged. View a list of local vaccine providers and vaccine distribution sites for details.

How do I schedule a vaccination appointment?

Visit MyTurn.ca.gov to view a list of Pasadena and other nearby locations offering COVID-19 vaccinations and schedule a vaccine appointment. The Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine is the only COVID-19 vaccine authorized for people under 18. A parent/legal guardian must complete the MyTurn online vaccine registration form for minors. Anyone who does not have internet access or who needs assistance scheduling an appointment using the MyTurn website can contact our Citizen Service Center at (626) 744-7311 Monday - Friday between the hours of 8 a.m. and 4 p.m.

Can I choose which vaccine I get?

You should get any COVID-19 vaccine that is available when you are eligible. Do not wait for a specific brand. All currently authorized and recommended COVID-19 vaccines are safe and effective, and the CDC does not recommend one vaccine over another.

Is the COVID-19 vaccine available to children?

The Pfizer vaccine has been authorized by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for children ages 12 and up.

Can you get COVID-19 from a vaccine?

No. None of the COVID-19 vaccines being developed in the United States have the virus that causes COVID-19 in them. Sometimes people get a fever or feel tired for a day or so after getting a vaccine. These symptoms are normal and are a sign that the body is building immunity. It usually takes a few weeks for the body to build immunity after vaccination. If a person got infected with the virus that causes COVID-19 just before or just after they got a shot they could still get COVID-19. This is because the vaccine has not had enough time to provide protection.

Are there side effects of COVID-19 vaccines?

COVID-19 vaccination will help protect you from getting COVID-19. You may have some side effects, which are normal signs that your body is building protection. Side effects may feel like flu and even affect your ability to do daily activities, but they should go away in a few days.

Common side effects include pain on the arm where you get the shot, fever, chills, tiredness or headache. If you have pain or discomfort, talk to your doctor about taking an over-the-counter medicine, such as ibuprofen or acetaminophen.

Will getting the vaccine cause me to test positive on a COVID-19 test?

No. Vaccines won’t cause you to test positive on a viral test (like the swab test) that looks for current COVID-19 infection. You may test positive on some antibody tests. This is because one of the ways that vaccines work is to teach your body to make antibodies.

Can I get COVID-19 after being fully vaccinated?

COVID-19 vaccines are highly effective. However, a small percentage of people who are fully vaccinated will still get COVID-19 if they are exposed to the virus that causes it. These are called “vaccine breakthrough cases.” This means that while people who have been vaccinated are far less likely to get sick, it may still happen.

What if I’m allergic to an ingredient in the vaccine/have a history of allergic reactions to vaccines?

The three COVID-19 vaccines currently available in the United States do not contain eggs, preservatives, or latex. For a full list of ingredients, please see each vaccine’s Fact Sheet for Recipients and Caregivers:

The CDC recommends that people with a history of severe allergic reactions not related to vaccines or injectable medications—such as food, pet, venom, environmental, or latex allergies—get vaccinated. People with a history of allergies to oral medications or a family history of severe allergic reactions may also get vaccinated. If you have had an immediate allergic reaction—even if it was not severe—to a vaccine or injectable therapy for another disease, ask your doctor if you should get a COVID-19 vaccine. Your doctor will help you decide if it is safe for you to get vaccinated.

Why do we need a vaccine if we can do other things, like social distance and wear masks?

We need to do as much as we can to stop the pandemic. Vaccines boost your immune system so it will be ready to fight the virus if you are exposed. Other steps, like masks and social distancing, help lower your chance of being exposed to or spreading the virus. Together, these tools offer the best protection from COVID-19.

How soon can I stop wearing a mask and practicing physical distancing after getting vaccinated?

Data has shown that, while the risk is much lower, it's still possible for fully vaccinated individuals to transmit COVID-19. Due to substantial COVID-19 transmission in Pasadena and surrounding LA County, everyone is required to wear a mask in indoor public settings—regardless of vaccination status—to help slow the spread.

Everyone, especially those who are unvaccinated or at higher risk of severe outcomes from COVID-19, should continue to take personal measures to reduce risk in addition to masking.

Unvaccinated and fully-vaccinated people should continue to follow CDC guidance for unvaccinated people and for fully-vaccinated people to protect themselves and others, including wearing a well-fitted mask, physical distancing (at least 6 feet), avoiding crowds, avoiding poorly ventilated spaces, covering coughs and sneezes, washing hands often, and following any applicable workplace, school, or business sector guidance or requirements.

Should I get a flu shot?

Yes! It is likely that the viruses that cause influenza (flu) and COVID-19 will both be spreading this winter. A flu shot only protects you from the flu, but at least it means you won’t run the risk of getting flu and COVID-19 at the same time. This can keep you from having a more severe illness. Getting a flu vaccine now is more important than ever. If you are likely to get the COVID-19 vaccine soon, ask your doctor about the best time to get the flu shot. This is because the two vaccines may have to be given several weeks apart.

If you are currently eligible to receive the COVID-19 vaccine, and would like to get more information about obtaining the COVID-19 vaccine, please submit your information using the form below. You will be asked to present proof of eligibility, and proof of a Pasadena residential address, or Pasadena business only if you qualify by eligible employment.

NOTE: This is not an appointment scheduler.

At this time we are waiting for vaccine supply from the State, and we will make appointments available when vaccine is available. Please contact your primary healthcare provider or local pharmacy who may have access to the COVID-19 vaccine sooner.

If you need assistance or have additional questions, please call the Citizen’s Service Center at (626) 744-7311

If you are a healthcare provider located in the City of Pasadena and you would like to get more information about obtaining the vaccine, please submit your information using the form below.

If you are a food or agriculture worker who works or lives in the City of Pasadena and would like to get more information about obtaining the vaccine, please submit your information using the form below.

NOTE: This is not an appointment scheduler.

At this time we are waiting for vaccine supply from the State, and we will make appointments available when vaccine is available. Please contact your primary healthcare provider or local pharmacy who may have access to the COVID-19 vaccine sooner.

If you need assistance or have additional questions, please call the Citizen’s Service Center at (626) 744-7311

If you are a childcare center or education worker who works or lives in the City of Pasadena and would like to get more information about obtaining the vaccine, please submit your information using the form below.

NOTE: This is not an appointment scheduler.

At this time we are waiting for vaccine supply from the State, and we will make appointments available when vaccine is available. Please contact your primary healthcare provider or local pharmacy who may have access to the COVID-19 vaccine sooner.

If you need assistance or have additional questions, please call the Citizen’s Service Center at (626) 744-7311

Please submit the form below to receive more information in the future on how to access the COVID-19 vaccine for Pasadena residents ages 65 and over.

NOTE: This is not an appointment scheduler.

At this time we are waiting for vaccine supply from the State, and we will make appointments available when vaccine is available. Please contact your primary healthcare provider who may have access to the COVID-19 vaccine sooner.

If you need assistance or have additional questions, please call the Citizen’s Service Center at (626) 744-7311.

Healthcare workers and residents of nursing homes and other long-term care facilities will be the first to receive the vaccine. Both the Pfizer and Moderna vaccine require two doses and provide the same efficacy. PPHD is managing the vaccine distribution process and will be following guidance from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the California Department of Public Health.

Phases and tiers for vaccine distribution were established by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) and CDPH. ACIP is an independent panel of medical and public health experts brought together by the CDC to make recommendations about vaccine policies. The ACIP recommends to the CDC which people should be in each phase. While states often follow the ACIP recommendations, final decisions about when different groups will get the vaccine are made by each state. In California, those decisions are being made by CDPH. The Pasadena Public Health Department is responsible for carrying out the state’s plan, deciding exactly how each phase of vaccine distribution will be carried out: where vaccines will be given, who will be giving the vaccines, and how the city will make sure everyone has a chance to get a vaccine when it is offered to people in their phase in an equitable manner.

Thirteen of Pasadena's Skilled Nursing Facilities (SNFs) are enrolled in the Pharmacy Partnership for Long-term Care (LTC) Program. The program has partnered with local pharmacies that will facilitate safe vaccination of this critical patient population, while reducing the burden on LTC facilities (LTCF). At no cost to facilities, the program provides end-to-end management of the COVID-19 vaccination process, including cold chain management, on-site vaccinations, and fulfillment of reporting requirements. LTCFs are coordinating appointments with the pharmacy partners.

When can I get the vaccine?

The supply of COVID-19 vaccines will be limited for the first few months. This means that the vaccine will be offered to different groups of people at different times. When enough vaccine is ready, it will be offered to everyone.

If you are a healthcare worker, contact your employer or complete the form below for more information. If you are a long-term care facility resident, contact your caretaker. In many parts of Pasadena and Los Angeles County, CVS and Walgreens pharmacies will administer the vaccines in long-term care facility staff and residents.

Pasadena residents and the community should coordinate with their healthcare providers for vaccine availability.

Where will I be able to get COVID-19 vaccine?

When vaccine is available to other groups of people, it will likely be given at:

  • Primary care offices and clinics
  • Pharmacies
  • Some workplaces
  • Public health vaccination clinics

Vaccination Phases (click to view the description for each phase)

Phase 1a - Currently vaccinating


  • Healthcare workers providing direct care
  • Residents and staff of long-term care facilities

Note: prioritization is subject to change.

View the California Department of Public Health Allocation Guidelines for COVID-19 Vaccine During Phase 1A: Recommendations.

Phase 1b - Currently Vaccinating as Supplies Allow


See the California Department of Public Health's Updated COVID-19 Vaccine Allocation Guidelines and Los Angeles County's Vaccine Distribution Phases for additional details.

For information on sectors designated as Essential Workforce, please visit https://covid19.ca.gov/essential-workforce/.

Phase 1c


  • Individuals 50 to 64 years of age
  • People ages 16 to 49 years who have underlying health condition or disability which increases their risk of severe COVID-19
  • Those at risk of exposure at work in the following sectors:
    • Water and wastewater
    • Defense
    • Energy
    • Chemical and hazardous materials
    • Communications and IT
    • Financial services
    • Government operations/community-based essential functions

Phase 2


  • Status: Proposed but may be modified by CDC and/or CDPH.
    • Persons 16-64 years old not previously vaccinated in other phases.

Phase 3


  • Status: Proposed but may be modified by CDC and/or CDPH.
    • Everyone residing in the United States who did not receive the vaccine in previous phases.

Phase 1a - Currently vaccinating


  • Healthcare workers providing direct care
  • Residents and staff of long-term care facilities

Note: prioritization is subject to change.

View the California Department of Public Health Allocation Guidelines for COVID-19 Vaccine During Phase 1A: Recommendations.

Phase 1b - Currently Vaccinating as Supplies Allow


See the California Department of Public Health's Updated COVID-19 Vaccine Allocation Guidelines and Los Angeles County's Vaccine Distribution Phases for additional details.

For information on sectors designated as Essential Workforce, please visit https://covid19.ca.gov/essential-workforce/.

Phase 1c


  • Individuals 50 to 64 years of age
  • People ages 16 to 49 years who have underlying health condition or disability which increases their risk of severe COVID-19
  • Those at risk of exposure at work in the following sectors:
    • Water and wastewater
    • Defense
    • Energy
    • Chemical and hazardous materials
    • Communications and IT
    • Financial services
    • Government operations/community-based essential functions

Phase 2


  • Status: Proposed but may be modified by CDC and/or CDPH.
    • Persons 16-64 years old not previously vaccinated in other phases.

Phase 3


  • Status: Proposed but may be modified by CDC and/or CDPH.
    • Everyone residing in the United States who did not receive the vaccine in previous phases.